Amish book author Reynold Kremer provides his insights and thoughts on the Amish, Mennonite, and Hutterite community.

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Amish Insights by Reynold R. Kremer

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05/15/12

Permalink 08:21:00 am, by Reynold Kremer Email , 934 words   English (US) latin1
Categories: Amish Articles

The Amish Family

THE AMISH FAMILY

© 2012 Reynold R. Kremer

Since the beginning of time, the family has been the center of creation’s society.  A husband and wife surrounded by a quiver full of children is precisely what the Lord had envisioned for his people.  And the Amish family well serves as an example of that home designed by the Lord.

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Permalink 08:17:00 am, by Reynold Kremer Email , 1519 words   English (US) latin1
Categories: Amish Articles

Amish Forgiveness

AMISH FORGIVENESS

© 2012 Reynold R. Kremer

I have often been told that the Amish church is a church of forgiveness.  If one searches Amish forgiveness online, one is inundated with sites that mention the Nickel Mines tragedy where so many innocent schoolgirls were brutally murdered by a crazed killer.  The Amish community, and especially the families of the children, came together and offered their forgiveness to the family of the gunman.  It was a moment that sent shock waves throughout the news media which could not imagine how forgiveness could be a part of the story.  Such forgiveness is commendable, because that is what God would have us do.

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05/14/12

Permalink 08:54:00 pm, by Reynold Kremer Email , 1334 words   English (US) latin1
Categories: Amish Articles

Modern Martyrs

MODERN MARTYRS

Copyright 2012  Reynold R. Kremer

To the Amish, the term martyr has special significance.  It was in 1660 that Thielman van Braght’s first edition of his famous Martyr’s Mirror or The Bloody Theater or Martyrs Mirror of the Defenseless Christians was published.  Consulting over 350 sources, van Braght compiled in a single volume the writings and confessions of hundreds of defenseless Christians who died for their beliefs.  Beheading, drowning, burning at the stake, and every other sort of cruel punishment was brought down on every Anabaptist who dared to stand up for his or her convictions, women and young people included.  Catholics, Protestants, and the state all wished to put a quick end to the radical reformers who followed the teachings of a few young men from Zurich, Switzerland. The newly formed Anabaptist church (the re-baptizers) was soon savagely attacked simply because of its disagreement with the established authority.  Some estimate that over 4,000 innocent martyrs died in the persecution.  You will likely find a copy of this 1,300 page volume in most Amish homes, and you will hear it quoted frequently in Amish sermons.

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Permalink 08:42:00 pm, by Reynold Kremer Email , 1010 words   English (US) latin1
Categories: Amish Articles

A Flaw in the Amish Heirarchy

A FLAW IN THE AMISH HEIRARCHY

© 2012 Reynold R. Kremer

The Amish claim an interesting history based on Jacob Ammann (1656-1730).  Jacob was an Anabaptist minister (and likely a tailor by occupation), who proposed several changes within the Anabaptist society.  Those changes included a doubling of the celebration of Holy Communion from one day per year to two, that everyone dress in plain clothes, without the adornment of buttons, (granted, buttons were just coming into vogue in those days and their prohibition was not completely ungrounded. ) the washing of feet prior to Holy Communion, and the shunning of individuals who were unrepentant of their sins.

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Permalink 08:21:00 pm, by Reynold Kremer Email , 1259 words   English (US) latin1
Categories: Amish Articles

The Ordnung: Rules But Not Sins

THE ORDNUNG: RULES BUT NOT SINS

© 2012 Reynold R. Kremer

In the 1700’s the Anabaptist believers began to create rules within each congregation called the Ordnung, a German term that means order or discipline. This practice has survived to the present day especially among the Amish people.  Today each Amish church district (congregation) boasts its own set of Ordnung rules.  Although remaining unwritten, these rules are taught to Amish of every age beginning with the very young.  Twice each year these rules are reviewed (at communion time) where they can be altered to add or subtract as necessary.  The Ordnung is not necessarily considered the law of God, but rather a list of guidelines for daily living.  They give each church its distinctive character.  The Amish people feel it reflects God’s orderliness which stands in stark contrast with the disorderliness of the world.

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Amish Insights Copyright 2012